Above: One Hundred and Four Elephants, Photograph by Traer Scott

WILDLIFE TRADE ART & SCIENCE is Creature Conserve's first major exhibition

The goal of “Wildlife Trade Art & Science” is to consider the role of global wildlife trade in species extinction and to empower the viewing public to take part in conservation. Organized by Creature Conserve, the exhibition features work by artists studying the impact of global trade on endangered species. Participating artists interviewed experts, including biologists, ecologists, veterinarians, park rangers, zookeepers, sanctuary managers, and policy-makers with the international Fund for Animal Welfare, in creating highly personal, emotionally-charged, artwork that is informed by the facts.

The exhibition premiered in July 2016 at the RISD Illustration Studies Building Gallery in Providence RI.  Since then, it has moved on to the National Museum of Wildlife Art in Jackson WY where it will be on display for two months during the summer of 2017 (June 24-Aug 24.)  Below are a few photos from the exhibit JUST installed at the NNWA. Included as you will see is a photo of our exhibition mascot, Percival Pangolin, checking out some very famous artwork by Andy Warhol. Here is a link to the museum website, https://www.wildlifeart.org/art/exhibits/current-exhibits/

 

PHOTOS FROM OUR OPENING RECEPTION at the rhode island school of design, JULY 15, 2016

the process: Art/Science Collaboration

Each artist was given the opportunity select from a list of the most heavily traded wildlife species and start with their own self-directed research. The animal list included chimpanzees, elephants, grey parrots, lions, pangolins, red and green macaws, rhinos, sea turtles, sharks, and tigers. Next, they collaborated with show organizer Dr. Lucy Spelman to explore the topic in depth. 

The artists discovered what scientists and wildlife law experts know all too well: the trade in wildlife is driving dozens of species toward rapid extinction. This is a heartbreaking topic for many of us; it is also far more complex than we realize. Human lives and livelihoods are at stake, as well as animal lives. It is also a problem we know how to solve: we need to decrease demand for the animals being traded, stop corruption and illegal trade, and increase the amount of money we spend protecting endangered species. 

Our postcard for the RISD opening featuring examples of some of the artwork in the show.

Our postcard for the RISD opening featuring examples of some of the artwork in the show.

Two southern white rhinos in Pilanesburg National Park, South Africa.

Two southern white rhinos in Pilanesburg National Park, South Africa.