As part of the creative process for this exhibition, we spoke to experts about the wildlife trade. From participating artist Insil Choi, "I was surprised to learn during a conference call with Grace de Gabriel, IFAW’s regional director for Asia programs, that the main problem is simple ignorance. She explained that many consumers of tiger parts do not know the ugly facts. They have no idea about the process of wildlife farming and trading."

From the brochure: 

There are six sub-species of TIGER, Panthera tigris (all are ENDANGERED), throughout Asia. They socialize through scent-markings and scratch marks; one male’s territory may overlap that of many females. Tigers are endangered because of trophy hunting for pelts, teeth, claws, and, for tiger parts including bones used to make ceremonial wind and traditional medicine, despite lack of evidence that they produce health benefits.

Insil Choi Take me home Painting: Gouache, digitally printed and enlarged My intent with this piece is to create intrigue and encourage the viewer to compare and contrast the precious beauty of a living tiger with an animal kept as a skin product in a cage. I hope people will feel enough anger or guilt to change their behavior about wildlife trading.   

Insil Choi
Take me home
Painting: Gouache, digitally printed and enlarged

My intent with this piece is to create intrigue and encourage the viewer to compare and contrast the precious beauty of a living tiger with an animal kept as a skin product in a cage. I hope people will feel enough anger or guilt to change their behavior about wildlife trading. 

 

Emily Schnall Snared Juvenile Sculpture: papier mâché, acrylic, 24 x 24 x 72 in. This piece is intended to address directly the poaching of wild tigers and indirectly the exploitation of captive tigers and the trade in tiger parts. Before we can make a bid to help these animals it is essential that we become more self-conscious and understand human attitudes toward them.   

Emily Schnall
Snared Juvenile
Sculpture: papier mâché, acrylic, 24 x 24 x 72 in.

This piece is intended to address directly the poaching of wild tigers and indirectly the exploitation of captive tigers and the trade in tiger parts. Before we can make a bid to help these animals it is essential that we become more self-conscious and understand human attitudes toward them. 

 

Jimmy Xia Fragility of the Amur Illustration: Digital, Archival Inkjet print, 24 x 48 in. In this piece I am exploring the current threats to the Amur Tiger by combining two artistic methods, animated and scientific illustration. By collaborating with scientists and animal experts, I now have a more intimate understanding of the personalities of these tigers as well as the problems they currently face in the wild.   

Jimmy Xia
Fragility of the Amur
Illustration: Digital, Archival Inkjet print, 24 x 48 in.

In this piece I am exploring the current threats to the Amur Tiger by combining two artistic methods, animated and scientific illustration. By collaborating with scientists and animal experts, I now have a more intimate understanding of the personalities of these tigers as well as the problems they currently face in the wild. 

 

Tiger graphic (banner) by Christina Ward

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