The word, shark, conjures up an image of a large scary finned animal with a long snout and gnashing teeth. But sharks are so much more. Basking sharks, for example, eat only plankton. Thresher sharks use their tails to kill prey. Hammerhead sharks swim in schools during the day and hunt alone at night. The first step in protecting this amazing group of animals is learning more about them.  

From the brochure:

SHARKS are found worldwide and include nearly four hundred species. All have an excellent sense of taste and can detect tiny amounts of chemicals in water– as little as one drop of blood; they can also can pick up electrical signals as tiny as those created by the muscles of their prey. Dozens of species of shark are being driven to extinction because of “finning,” the harvesting of just their fins for soup, including Great Hammerhead Sharks, Sphyrna mokarran (ENDANGERED), Thresher Sharks, Alopias species (VULNERABLE), and Whale Sharks, Rhincodon typus (VULNERABLE).

Codi Fant Cheers to the Bride and Groom Sculpture: Mixed materials, 36 x 36 x 60 in. We need to make “finning” and the resulting loss of sharks more real, and more repulsive in order to radically change people’s opinions. We need to stop consuming a dish that has been a cultural symbol for centuries because there simply are not enough sharks. Stop the demand, and we can stop the decline.  

Codi Fant
Cheers to the Bride and Groom
Sculpture: Mixed materials, 36 x 36 x 60 in.

We need to make “finning” and the resulting loss of sharks more real, and more repulsive in order to radically change people’s opinions. We need to stop consuming a dish that has been a cultural symbol for centuries because there simply are not enough sharks. Stop the demand, and we can stop the decline.

 

Lee Fearnside Swimming in Shark Fin Soup Animation: Digital, 8 x 12 x 2 in. The process we followed for this exhibition was especially compelling for me as an artist. Often, I make my work in isolation, but the connection to scientists and IFAW staff allowed me to see how each piece fits together as part of a holistic approach to animal conservation....My goal with this photo-based animation is to make the audience aware that the whale shark’s life cycle is affected by not only human predation but also by human behavior.  

Lee Fearnside
Swimming in Shark Fin Soup
Animation: Digital, 8 x 12 x 2 in.

The process we followed for this exhibition was especially compelling for me as an artist. Often, I make my work in isolation, but the connection to scientists and IFAW staff allowed me to see how each piece fits together as part of a holistic approach to animal conservation....My goal with this photo-based animation is to make the audience aware that the whale shark’s life cycle is affected by not only human predation but also by human behavior.

 

Derek Miranda Rhincodon typus Painting: Oil on canvas, 56 x 121.5 in. The Whale Shark, the largest fish in the ocean, is an animal that captures our imagination. In some cultures, we revere it, believing it connected to the heavens and stars. But its populations are dwindling and it is now endangered.  In this piece I am attempting to capture the imposing and humbling presence of the Whale Shark, while simultaneously denying it. By removing the image and leaving the remnants of a massive painting, I hope to present to the viewer the emotional toll of their potential loss. The question is  "What would an ocean be like without Whale Sharks?”

Derek Miranda
Rhincodon typus
Painting: Oil on canvas, 56 x 121.5 in.

The Whale Shark, the largest fish in the ocean, is an animal that captures our imagination. In some cultures, we revere it, believing it connected to the heavens and stars. But its populations are dwindling and it is now endangered.  In this piece I am attempting to capture the imposing and humbling presence of the Whale Shark, while simultaneously denying it. By removing the image and leaving the remnants of a massive painting, I hope to present to the viewer the emotional toll of their potential loss. The question is  "What would an ocean be like without Whale Sharks?”

Shark graphic (banner) by Christina Ward

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