The wildlife trade continues to be a huge threat to all species of macaw and parrot. The numbers do not tell the whole story. These birds are plentiful where their forest habitats remain intact, making them relatively easy to capture. Now is the time to actively protect them. Otherwise, the Red and Green macaw will go the way of the Lear's macaw, safe enough in captivity, but gone from the wild.

From the brochure: 

RED AND GREEN MACAWS, or green-winged macaws, Ara chloropterus (LEAST CONCERN) are found in tropical forests and woodlands of southern Central America and northern to mid South America. Their diet in the wild includes clay, which they eat to counteract the toxins found in many of their preferred foods, including cashews and palm fruit. Though their population numbers are high enough to keep them off the endangered species list, they are increasingly in trouble from the pet trade. 

Pedro Busana A Study of the Breeding Behavior of the Lear’s Macaw Illustration: Digital, Archival inkjet print In the 1980’s there were just sixty Lear’s Macaws; since then this species has been bred in captivity with some success; the population now is estimated at 1,200 individuals. For this piece, I used reproductive behavior ethogram data provided by zoo researcher Gabriela Rodrigues Favorettoone.   

Pedro Busana
A Study of the Breeding Behavior of the Lear’s Macaw
Illustration: Digital, Archival inkjet print

In the 1980’s there were just sixty Lear’s Macaws; since then this species has been bred in captivity with some success; the population now is estimated at 1,200 individuals. For this piece, I used reproductive behavior ethogram data provided by zoo researcher Gabriela Rodrigues Favorettoone. 

 

Wen Hsu Mesh, Beak and Feather Collage: Embroidery, pencil and ink on watercolor paper, 16 x 17 in. Through the papers and talks provided by the collaboration with scientists, experts, and the IFAW staff, I was able to delve further into a situation I had only seen occasionally and superficially... I chose embroidery because it is a medium traditionally used to create beautiful and luxurious fabrics. It is also labor intensive, and the process gave me time to contemplate and process my own feelings of sadness, anger and impotence.   

Wen Hsu
Mesh, Beak and Feather
Collage: Embroidery, pencil and ink on watercolor paper, 16 x 17 in.

Through the papers and talks provided by the collaboration with scientists, experts, and the IFAW staff, I was able to delve further into a situation I had only seen occasionally and superficially... I chose embroidery because it is a medium traditionally used to create beautiful and luxurious fabrics. It is also labor intensive, and the process gave me time to contemplate and process my own feelings of sadness, anger and impotence. 

 

Emily Poole Pondering Parrots Illustration: Watercolor, gouache This work explores three points from which we fail these birds: when a Red and Green Macaw is taken from its nest and treated as a tradable object rather than a sentient being; when a bird is kept as a pet in an environment that does not meet its complex dietary, physical, and social needs; when a bird’s identity is forced to change as it passes through multiple homes.  

Emily Poole
Pondering Parrots
Illustration: Watercolor, gouache

This work explores three points from which we fail these birds: when a Red and Green Macaw is taken from its nest and treated as a tradable object rather than a sentient being; when a bird is kept as a pet in an environment that does not meet its complex dietary, physical, and social needs; when a bird’s identity is forced to change as it passes through multiple homes.

 

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