When I meet people interested in Creature Conserve, I am quick to point out our logo. I continue by explaining that the pangolin is the most traded animal in the world, and that all 8 species are in big trouble. More often than not, I realize I need to say more and add, "It may have sounded like I said penguin, but I didn't. I said PANG-O-LIN, also known as the scaly anteater." 

From the "Wildlife: Trading and Conservation" brochure:

There are eight species of PANGOLINS, four in Asia (Manis species, (ENDANGERED TO CRITICALLY ENDANGERED) and four in Africa (two Phataginus species and two Smutsia species, (both VULNERABLE). They are similar to anteaters with a very long tongue and no teeth; they are also similar to birds with a thick stomach wall that helps to grind up their diet of ants and termites. They are the most trafficked mammal in the world, for their meat in ceremonial dishes and their scales in traditional medicine and for jewelry.

Carissa Abatabilo Species…Not Status Sculpture:  Clay with Animation, 24 x 24 in. The beauty of the pangolin—and the need to protect it—was my inspiration for this piece. In this animation, I explore the texture of the pangolin’s hide, and contrast that with the texture of the environment in which it is hunted and consumed as a healing commodity in Eastern medical practice.    

Carissa Abatabilo
Species…Not Status
Sculpture:  Clay with Animation, 24 x 24 in.

The beauty of the pangolin—and the need to protect it—was my inspiration for this piece. In this animation, I explore the texture of the pangolin’s hide, and contrast that with the texture of the environment in which it is hunted and consumed as a healing commodity in Eastern medical practice.  

 

Hazel Elsbach A Pangolin is Not a Fruit Illustration: Graphite, woodcut, series of 6.5 x 10 in. drawings on wall and on table. The wall of sketches symbolizes a quilt of misinformation. The blank sheets of paper stand for our failure to take action, and the act of making a rubbing (print) pulls the truth into focus. I hope to encourage others to do their own exploration of the problem of wildlife trade, as this project has done for me.

Hazel Elsbach
A Pangolin is Not a Fruit
Illustration: Graphite, woodcut, series of 6.5 x 10 in. drawings on wall and on table.

The wall of sketches symbolizes a quilt of misinformation. The blank sheets of paper stand for our failure to take action, and the act of making a rubbing (print) pulls the truth into focus. I hope to encourage others to do their own exploration of the problem of wildlife trade, as this project has done for me.

Angela Hseih Moving Object Animation: Digital, monitor. A topic as expansive as conservation is greater than the sum of its parts, yet it must be broken down in order for us to understand it. Our conversations with IFAW experts gave me a glimpse into what I now see as a monumental and complex effort to save the pangolin.   

Angela Hseih
Moving Object
Animation: Digital, monitor.

A topic as expansive as conservation is greater than the sum of its parts, yet it must be broken down in order for us to understand it. Our conversations with IFAW experts gave me a glimpse into what I now see as a monumental and complex effort to save the pangolin. 

 

Sabrina Mortensen Demystify – 2016 Illustration: Digital, Archival inkjet print, 7 x 9 in. We need to demystify and separate the real animal (the pangolin) that is in need of our help, from the romantic imaginary one. Otherwise, this rare scaly mammal will disappear before it is known, and before we know it.  

Sabrina Mortensen
Demystify – 2016
Illustration: Digital, Archival inkjet print, 7 x 9 in.

We need to demystify and separate the real animal (the pangolin) that is in need of our help, from the romantic imaginary one. Otherwise, this rare scaly mammal will disappear before it is known, and before we know it.

 

Yixuan Wang What Are You Looking For? Digital, acrylic mirror In this piece I seek to acknowledge the damaging way in which humans project their own desires onto wild animals, including the consumption of pangolin scales for medicine and meat for fancy meals. At the same time, I hope to give the viewer a chance to question their priorities and change their behavior.    

Yixuan Wang
What Are You Looking For?
Digital, acrylic mirror

In this piece I seek to acknowledge the damaging way in which humans project their own desires onto wild animals, including the consumption of pangolin scales for medicine and meat for fancy meals. At the same time, I hope to give the viewer a chance to question their priorities and change their behavior.  

 

Pangolin graphic (banner) by Christina Ward

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