creature conserve in the news

Dr. Lucy Spelman (holding camera) Guyana with RISD students, 2014

Dr. Lucy Spelman (holding camera) Guyana with RISD students, 2014

Dr. Lucy Spelman in The artful mind artzine

by Harryet P. Candee June 1, 2017

Learn more about Creature Conserve founder Dr. Lucy Spelman in this telling interview.

Spelman reveals the motivations and inspirations behind her work at Creature Conserve, and the challenges that come with combatting global issues such as conservation. Discover ways this non-profit helps and is helped, and stay informed about how you could be doing more to promote conservation.

Click below for online story, starting at pg 12

Plastic Pacific by Chloe Bulpin

Plastic Pacific by Chloe Bulpin

This Surprising Practice Could Help Save Our Planet

by Emma Loewe May 22, 2017

The future of our planet looks bleak at times. Visual artists are working to paint a prettier picture.

"Earth Without Art Is Just Eh." I'm not sure where I first saw this fun little play on words, but I can't seem to shake it. For me, it's a reminder that art—visual art in particular—defines our world. And it just might be the thing that saves it.

Link to PDF or click below for online story

Octopus by Rae Whiteley

Octopus by Rae Whiteley

Design student uses art to show aquarium bond with animals

by Joe Wojtas January 29, 2017

Mystic — When college interns arrive to work with the animal care staff at Mystic Aquarium they typically come from marine biology and other scientific fields.

That changed this past summer when Rae Whiteley, who recently graduated from the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design with a degree in illustration, spent five weeks observing and sketching the staff as they worked with the animals. 

Link to PDF or click below for online story

Moving Object by Angela Hsieh

Moving Object by Angela Hsieh

art exhibit features wildlife trafficking

by Kevin Proft July 9, 2016

PROVIDENCE — Imagine a pine cone about the size of a house cat. Now give it four stubby legs with clawed feet, a scaly, prehensile tail, and a neck-less, long-snouted head. What you’ve imagined is a pangolin, thought to be the world’s most trafficked mammal.

Native to Asia and Africa, the eight species of pangolin are highly sought after in Asian countries, such as China and Vietnam. There, pangolin meat is considered a delicacy and status symbol, and its keratin scales are crafted into jewelry and medicine despite its lack of medicinal properties. It’s blood is consumed for its imagined healing and aphrodisiac powers.

Link to PDF or click below for online story